Colitis Articles A-Z

Pentasa and Pregnancy - Rowasa Warnings and Precautions

This page contains links to eMedTV Colitis Articles containing information on subjects from Pentasa and Pregnancy to Rowasa Warnings and Precautions. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • Pentasa and Pregnancy
    Pentasa is generally considered safe to use during pregnancy. This eMedTV segment describes the animal studies conducted on Pentasa and pregnancy, and explains when a healthcare provider will prescribe the drug to a pregnant woman.
  • Pentasa Dangers
    If you are taking Pentasa, it's important to know that it may increase your risk of kidney problems. As this eMedTV page explains, however, most people are able to take it safely and effectively. This article looks at the potential dangers of Pentasa.
  • Pentasa Dosage
    For those who are treating ulcerative colitis with Pentasa, the dosage starts at 1 gram four times a day. This eMedTV resource contains other Pentasa dosing guidelines, including tips and precautions for those taking the medication.
  • Pentasa Drug Class
    As this selection from the eMedTV Web site explains, Pentasa is classified as an aminosalicylate. This article briefly describes how the drug works to treat ulcerative colitis and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Pentasa Drug Interactions
    If digoxin or warfarin is combined with Pentasa, drug interactions may occur. This section of the eMedTV Web site describes the side effects and complications that may occur as a result of these potentially negative interactions.
  • Pentasa for Ulcerative Colitis
    There are several treatments for ulcerative colitis, including medications like Pentasa. This eMedTV article takes a closer look at using Pentasa for this purpose, including details on how the drug works. A link to more information is also included.
  • Pentasa Indications
    The main use (or "indication") for Pentasa is the treatment of ulcerative colitis. This eMedTV segment discusses the uses for this medicine in some detail, including its unapproved use for another condition. A link to more information is also provided.
  • Pentasa Medication Information
    If you have ulcerative colitis, your healthcare provider may prescribe Pentasa. This eMedTV Web article provides important information on the medication Pentasa, including possible side effects, dosing information, and general safety precautions.
  • Pentasa Oral
    This eMedTV article explains that Pentasa is an oral medication used for ulcerative colitis. This resource outlines some important facts about this medicine, including side effects, dosing guidelines, and how to ensure the safest treatment possible.
  • Pentasa Overdose
    Possible signs of a Pentasa overdose include drowsiness, sweating, and ringing in the ears. This segment of the eMedTV library describes other symptoms that may occur during a Pentasa overdose and lists treatment options that are available.
  • Pentasa Pills
    This eMedTV article describes Pentasa, a medication prescribed to treat ulcerative colitis. This page offers more details on Pentasa pills, including how this medication works and potential side effects. A link to more information is also included.
  • Pentasa Risks
    As this eMedTV resource makes clear, Pentasa is not free from risks. This Web page describes the most common side effects seen with this drug, explains how you can help reduce the chance of such problems, and links to more information on this topic.
  • Pentasa Safety
    People with kidney disease may not be able to safely use Pentasa. This article from the eMedTV Web library discusses other potential safety concerns to be aware of before using this medicine. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Pentasa Side Effects
    Nausea and diarrhea are the most common problems with Pentasa. Side effects that are less common, as this eMedTV segment explains, include drowsiness, dry skin, and dizziness. Serious side effects that require medical attention are also listed.
  • Pentasa Uses
    Pentasa is a prescription drug that is used for treating ulcerative colitis. As this eMedTV article explains, the medication can also be used in an "off-label" fashion to treat other conditions. Possible off-label Pentasa uses are also described.
  • Pentasa Warnings and Precautions
    Before taking Pentasa, let your doctor know if you have liver disease, kidney disease, or any allergies. This eMedTV Web page contains other important Pentasa warnings and precautions, and explains those who should avoid taking the medicine.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Azathioprine
    This portion of the eMedTV archives provides a detailed list of important precautions and warnings with azathioprine. For example, it may not be safe for pregnant women and it can increase the risk of certain types of cancer in some people.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Infliximab
    This eMedTV Web page examines several precautions and warnings with infliximab, such as an increased risk of lymphoma and the danger of taking the medication if you have an infection. This page also lists those who should not take the drug.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Natalizumab
    As explained in this eMedTV page, natalizumab may not be an appropriate treatment option for someone with a history of an organ transplant or liver disease. This page lists warnings and precautions for natalizumab, and describes problems that may occur.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Sulfasalazine
    You should not take sulfasalazine if you have an intestinal or urinary blockage. This eMedTV Web page contains other precautions and warnings with sulfasalazine, including a more detailed list of people who should avoid taking the medication.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Sulfasalazine Delayed-Release
    You should not take sulfasalazine delayed-release if you are allergic to sulfa drugs or aspirin. This eMedTV page contains other precautions and warnings with sulfasalazine delayed-release, including a detailed list of who should not take the drug.
  • Problems With Asacol
    Some people who take Asacol develop problems such as belching, muscle pain, and a sore throat. This eMedTV article explores the side effects of this ulcerative colitis treatment and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Problems With Azulfidine
    The most commonly reported problems with Azulfidine include headaches and nausea. This page of the eMedTV Web site describes other side effects this drug may cause, including rare and potentially serious ones, and what to do if they occur.
  • Problems With Colazal
    Diarrhea and joint pain are some of the commonly reported problems with Colazal. However, as this eMedTV segment explains, most people are able to take it without having any reactions. This article offers a brief overview of the drug's side effects.
  • Problems With Humira
    Some of the potential problems with Humira can involve nausea and sinus infections. This article from the eMedTV Web site describes other possible risks with this drug, including potentially serious side effects that require immediate medical care.
  • Problems With Infliximab
    Infliximab is generally a safe and effective treatment for many inflammatory conditions. However, as this eMedTV page explains, problems can occur while using it. This article looks at some of infliximab's most commonly reported side effects.
  • Problems With Lialda
    This selection of the eMedTV archives provides a brief look at some problems with Lialda that you should be aware of before starting treatment. It also includes a link to more detailed information on this topic.
  • Problems With Pentasa
    In general, most people do not have any problems with Pentasa; however, this eMedTV segment explains that adverse reactions are still possible. This page discusses some of the most common side effects of Pentasa and offers a link to more information.
  • Problems With Sulfasalazine
    Headache, nausea, and loss of appetite have been known to occur in people taking sulfasalazine. This eMedTV article lists some other problems with sulfasalazine that may develop and provides a link to more detailed information on this topic.
  • Rowasa
    Rowasa is a medication used for treating ulcerative colitis affecting the rectum and last part of the colon. This eMedTV page explains how the drug works to improve symptoms of ulcerative proctitis, offers general dosing information, and more.
  • Rowasa and Breastfeeding
    It is not known for sure if Rowasa passes through breast milk. This eMedTV article discusses the research findings on Rowasa and breastfeeding, and explains why the drug (which is in the form of an enema) isn't absorbed into the blood in high levels.
  • Rowasa and Hair Loss
    There are many possible side effects of Rowasa, and hair loss is a rare but possible problem. This eMedTV segment discusses how common hair loss is with Rowasa and explains what your doctor may recommend if you experience this side effect.
  • Rowasa and Pregnancy
    The full risks of using Rowasa during pregnancy are not known, but it's most likely safe for pregnant women. This eMedTV article offers more information on Rowasa and pregnancy, including a discussion of the studies conducted on pregnant animals.
  • Rowasa Dosage
    The suggested Rowasa dosage for treating ulcerative colitis or ulcerative proctitis is one enema once daily. This eMedTV resource offers more information on Rowasa dosing, including a list of tips on when and how to use the Rowasa enema.
  • Rowasa Drug Interactions
    If you take digoxin or warfarin along with Rowasa, drug interactions may potentially occur. This eMedTV page explains how Rowasa interactions can make digoxin or warfarin less effective.
  • Rowasa Enema
    As this eMedTV page explains, Rowasa is a prescription ulcerative colitis drug that is used as an enema. This article looks at what types of ulcerative colitis it can treat, what to expect, and more. A link to more information is also included.
  • Rowasa Side Effects
    Rowasa side effects may include the flu, a fever, and abdominal pain (or stomach pain). This page on the eMedTV site lists other common side effects of Rowasa, describes less common problems, and explains which side effects require medical attention.
  • Rowasa Uses
    Rowasa is used for treating ulcerative colitis that affects just the rectum and the last part of the colon. This eMedTV article explains how Rowasa works, describes the effects of the drug, and covers possible "off-label" Rowasa uses.
  • Rowasa Warnings and Precautions
    You should not take Rowasa if you are allergic to sulfites or any components used to make Rowasa. This eMedTV Web page contains other Rowasa warnings and precautions, including possible side effects that may occur during treatment with the medicine.
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