Colitis Articles A-Z

Azulfidine Drug Interactions - Cimzia Warnings and Precautions

This page contains links to eMedTV Colitis Articles containing information on subjects from Azulfidine Drug Interactions to Cimzia Warnings and Precautions. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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  • Azulfidine Drug Interactions
    Medicines that may cause Azulfidine drug interactions include digoxin, warfarin, and folic acid. This part of the eMedTV library explores the possible side effects or complications that may occur when these drugs are combined with Azulfidine.
  • Azulfidine for Ulcerative Colitis
    If you have ulcerative colitis, your healthcare provider may recommend a drug called Azulfidine. This eMedTV article explains how this prescription drug works to treat this condition and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Azulfidine Indications
    The main use (or "indication") for Azulfidine is the treatment of ulcerative colitis. This eMedTV segment discusses the uses for this medicine in more detail, including unapproved uses. A link to more detailed information is also provided.
  • Azulfidine Medication Information
    This eMedTV resource gives a brief overview of Azulfidine, an ulcerative colitis drug. This article provides basic information on what to expect while taking this medication and offers some dosing guidelines. A link to more details is also included.
  • Azulfidine Oral
    This eMedTV page explains that Azulfidine is an oral medication used for ulcerative colitis. This article outlines some important facts about this medicine, including side effects, dosing guidelines, and how to ensure the safest treatment possible.
  • Azulfidine Overdose
    Symptoms of an Azulfidine overdose may include nausea or vomiting, drowsiness, and abdominal pain. This eMedTV Web page describes other possible signs of an overdose and lists the various treatment options that are available.
  • Azulfidine Pills
    Azulfidine, which is available in the form of tablets, is commonly used for ulcerative colitis. This eMedTV resource describes when and how to take these pills, and includes a link to more in-depth information on Azulfidine.
  • Azulfidine Risks
    As this eMedTV article discusses, Azulfidine is not free from risks. This Web page describes common side effects reported with this drug, explains how you can help reduce the chance of such problems, and links to more information on this topic.
  • Azulfidine Safety
    If you are allergic to aspirin, you should not take Azulfidine. This selection from the eMedTV Web site covers other safety concerns to be aware of before taking Azulfidine, as well as what to discuss with your healthcare provider.
  • Azulfidine Side Effects
    Headache, nausea or vomiting, and loss of appetite are some of the most common Azulfidine side effects. This eMedTV article also describes less common side effects of the drug, as well as serious problems that may require medical attention.
  • Azulfidine Uses
    Azulfidine works to reduce symptoms of ulcerative colitis by relieving inflammation. This eMedTV article describes how the medication achieves this and offers a list of possible "off-label" Azulfidine uses.
  • Azulfidine Warnings and Precautions
    Azulfidine can cause low sperm count and infertility in men. This eMedTV page contains other important Azulfidine warnings and precautions, including other side effects that may occur and information on what to tell your doctor before taking it.
  • Benefits of Asacol
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Asacol to treat ulcerative colitis. This page from the eMedTV Web library briefly discusses the potential benefits of Asacol and provides a link to more in-depth information on this medication.
  • Benefits of Azulfidine
    The prescription drug Azulfidine offers several benefits for people with ulcerative colitis. This eMedTV segment briefly explores this topic, with a look at how this medicine works, its effects, and general dosing information.
  • Benefits of Canasa
    Canasa is a suppository prescribed to treat ulcerative proctitis. This selection from the eMedTV Web library briefly discusses the potential benefits of Canasa, including details on how the medication works and how it is taken.
  • Benefits of Colazal
    Colazal is specifically designed to treat mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis. This eMedTV page further explores who may benefit from Colazal, including information on how the drug works. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Benefits of Humira
    A doctor may prescribe Humira to treat inflammatory conditions such as arthritis and Crohn's disease. This eMedTV Web page briefly discusses the potential benefits of Humira and provides a link to more in-depth information on this medication.
  • Benefits of Infliximab
    A doctor may prescribe infliximab to treat inflammatory conditions such as arthritis and Crohn's disease. This eMedTV Web page briefly discusses the potential benefits of infliximab and provides a link to more in-depth information on this medication.
  • Benefits of Lialda
    Lialda is specifically designed to treat mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis. This eMedTV page further explores who may benefit from Lialda, including information on how the drug works. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Benefits of Pentasa
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Pentasa to treat ulcerative colitis. This selection from the eMedTV Web site briefly discusses the potential benefits of Pentasa, including details on the results of clinical studies on the effectiveness of the drug.
  • Benefits of Sulfasalazine
    A doctor may prescribe sulfasalazine to treat inflammatory conditions such as ulcerative colitis. This eMedTV Web page briefly discusses the potential benefits of sulfasalazine and provides a link to more in-depth information on this medication.
  • Budesinide
    Available by prescription, budesonide is a drug approved to treat Crohn's disease, allergies, and more. This eMedTV resource offers an overview of this drug and provides a link to more information. Budesinide is a common misspelling of budesonide.
  • Budesonid
    Asthma and Crohn's disease are two of the conditions that can be treated with budesonide. This eMedTV segment takes a brief look at the drug and provides a link to more detailed information. Budesonid is a common misspelling of budesonide.
  • Budesonida
    Budesonide is a prescription medicine approved to treat asthma, allergies, and more. This eMedTV article briefly describes the drug and provides a link to more detailed information. Budesonida is the Spanish name for budesonide.
  • Budesonide
    Budesonide is licensed for the treatment of asthma, allergies, and other conditions. This eMedTV page describes how budesonide helps reduce inflammation, lists some of the available products, and explains the factors that will determine your dosage.
  • Budosenide
    Budesonide is a drug used to treat allergies, asthma, and other conditions. This part of the eMedTV library talks about budesonide, including an explanation of how the prescription medication works. Budosenide is a common misspelling of budesonide.
  • Budosinide
    A prescription drug, budesonide is used to treat conditions such as allergies and asthma. This eMedTV Web page briefly describes budesonide and provides a link to more information on the topic. Budosinide is a common misspelling of budesonide.
  • Canasa
    Canasa is a prescription medication used to reduce symptoms of ulcerative proctitis. This eMedTV page explains how to use the drug (which comes in suppository form), describes how it works, and lists precautions to be aware of before using it.
  • Canasa (Mesalamine) Drug Information
    This eMedTV Web page offers some basic drug information on Canasa (mesalamine), a drug used for ulcerative proctitis. This article explains how to use it, lists some of the potential side effects, and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Canasa 1000 Mg Suppositories
    Available in the form of 1000-mg suppositories, Canasa is used for the treatment of ulcerative proctitis. This eMedTV resource gives some basic dosing guidelines for this medication and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Canasa and Breastfeeding
    Canasa is most likely safe to use while breastfeeding. This eMedTV resource offers more information on Canasa and breastfeeding, including an explanation of whether the drug is passed through breast milk and how the drug's form affects this.
  • Canasa and Pregnancy
    Canasa is generally considered safe for pregnant women. This section of the eMedTV Web site offers more information on Canasa and pregnancy, and describes the research findings on the effects of the drug in pregnant animals.
  • Canasa Dangers
    You may not be able to use Canasa safely if you have certain conditions, such as kidney disease. This eMedTV article further explores potential Canasa dangers and explains what you should be aware of before starting treatment with this drug.
  • Canasa Dosage
    Most people start with a Canasa dosage of one suppository inserted once daily at bedtime. This page on the eMedTV Web site contains other dosing guidelines and offers tips on how to use the Canasa suppository properly.
  • Canasa Drug Class
    This page of the eMedTV Web site describes the drug class to which Canasa belongs, briefly explains how this medicine works, and lists an off-label use. It also includes a link to more information on what Canasa is used for.
  • Canasa Drug Interactions
    Canasa may potentially interact with certain medications, such as warfarin and digoxin. This section of the eMedTV library further describes the possible problems that may occur with these particular Canasa drug interactions.
  • Canasa for Ulcerative Proctitis
    This eMedTV article explains that Canasa, a prescription drug, is often used to treat the symptoms of ulcerative proctitis. This Web page takes a look at how the medicine works to treat this condition and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Canasa Indications
    This article from the eMedTV library describes the primary approved use (indication) for Canasa. It also discusses when and how to use this medicine, and includes a link to more information on using Canasa.
  • Canasa Medication Information
    Canasa is a prescription drug licensed to treat ulcerative proctitis. This page from the eMedTV Web site provides more information on Canasa, explaining the medication's dosing guidelines, possible side effects, general safety precautions, and more.
  • Canasa Rectal Suppositories
    This eMedTV segment provides a brief overview of Canasa rectal suppositories. It includes some basic dosing guidelines for this drug, explains when and how to use it, and offers a link to more in-depth information on this product.
  • Canasa Risks
    As this eMedTV resource explains, Canasa presents a greater risk of problems in some people than in others. This page describes the circumstances when a different medication may need to be considered and lists a few common side effects of this drug.
  • Canasa Safety
    If you are taking Canasa, you may have an increased risk for kidney damage. This eMedTV Web selection discusses other potential safety concerns to be aware of before using Canasa. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Canasa Side Effects
    The most common Canasa side effects seen in clinical studies include dizziness, rectal pain, and acne. This eMedTV segment lists other common side effects of the drug and also explains which ones should be reported promptly to a healthcare provider.
  • Canasa Uses
    Canasa is used for the treatment of ulcerative proctitis in adults. This eMedTV Web page explains how the drug works to treat symptoms of ulcerative proctitis, addresses giving the drug to children, and describes possible "off-label" Canasa uses.
  • Canasa Warnings and Precautions
    Canasa may potentially cause pericarditis, an inflammation of the sac around the heart. This eMedTV page contains more Canasa warnings and precautions, including a list of other possible side effects and certain people who should avoid the drug.
  • Cause of Ulcerative Colitis
    This eMedTV article explains that although researchers don't know the cause of ulcerative colitis, they have several theories about what might cause the disease. Among these possible causes are genetics and the environment.
  • Cholitis
    Ulcerative colitis is a disease that can cause rectal bleeding and other problems. This eMedTV article offers an overview of the condition and provides a link to more information. Cholitis is a common misspelling and variation of ulcerative colitis.
  • Cholitis Diet
    There is no diet that has been proven effective for treating ulcerative colitis; however, as this eMedTV page explains, avoiding certain foods may reduce its symptoms. Cholitis diet is a common misspelling and variation of ulcerative colitis diet.
  • Chrone Disease
    Crohn's disease, as this eMedTV Web page explains, is a condition affecting the digestive tract. It causes inflammation and diarrhea, and while it can't be cured, the symptoms can be managed. Chrone disease is a common misspelling of Crohn's disease.
  • Chrones Disease
    Crohn's disease occurs when the digestive tract becomes inflamed, which can cause recurring diarrhea. This eMedTV article provides an overview of the condition and links to more information. Chrones disease is a common misspelling of Crohn's disease.
  • Chrones Disease Diet
    While no diet can cure Crohn's disease, avoiding certain foods may help control symptoms. This eMedTV article lists some of these foods and provides a link to more information. Chrones disease diet is a common misspelling of Crohn's disease diet.
  • Chrones Disease Symptoms
    Crohn's disease symptoms can be frequent or they may only occur now and then. This eMedTV page provides information about specific signs and a link to more information. Chrones disease symptoms is a common misspelling of Crohn's disease symptoms.
  • Chrones Disease Treatment
    Dietary changes, lifestyle changes, and drugs are some of the treatment options for Crohn's disease. This eMedTV page also provides a link to more information on the topic. Chrones disease treatment is a common misspelling of Crohn's disease treatment.
  • Chrons Colitis
    Crohn's disease is a type of inflammatory bowel disease. This eMedTV resource offers a brief overview of this condition and provides a link to more detailed information. Chrons colitis is a common misspelling and variation of Crohn's disease.
  • Chrons Disease
    Crohn's disease occurs when there is an inflammation in the digestive tract. This eMedTV resource describes symptoms of the disease, such as diarrhea, as well as treatment options. Chrons disease is a common misspelling of Crohn's disease.
  • Chrons Disease Symptoms
    This eMedTV article covers common Crohn's disease symptoms (such as chronic diarrhea) and symptoms often seen in children with the disease (such as unexplained weight loss). Chrons disease symptoms is a common misspelling of Crohn's disease symptoms.
  • Cimzia
    Cimzia is a medicine used for relieving the symptoms of Crohn's disease and other conditions. This eMedTV Web page describes how the drug works, explains how often it needs to be taken, and lists some of its potential side effects.
  • Cimzia and Breastfeeding
    The manufacturer of Cimzia (certolizumab pegol) does not recommend using this drug while breastfeeding. This eMedTV resource offers more information on Cimzia and breastfeeding, and explains whether this medicine passes through breast milk.
  • Cimzia and Hair Loss
    Hair loss is a rare but possible side effect that has been reported with Cimzia. This eMedTV page provides more information about Cimzia and hair loss, and explains what your healthcare provider may recommend if this side effect occurs.
  • Cimzia and Pregnancy
    The full risks of using Cimzia (certolizumab pegol) during pregnancy are not known at this time. As this eMedTV article explains, however, animal studies on Cimzia and pregnancy show that no problems occurred when the drug was given to pregnant rats.
  • Cimzia Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, the recommended starting dose of Cimzia for Crohn's disease is 400 mg every two weeks for three doses, followed by one dose every four weeks (if the drug works for you). This article also covers dosing for other conditions.
  • Cimzia Interactions
    Anakinra and "live" vaccinations may cause potentially negative drug interactions with Cimzia. As this eMedTV segment explains, if you receive a live vaccine while taking Cimzia, you could become infected with the virus or bacteria from the vaccine.
  • Cimzia Medication Information
    This page of the eMedTV library provides some information on Cimzia, a medication used to treat both rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease. This segment explains how the drug works, describes dosing basics, and reviews what to tell your doctor.
  • Cimzia Overdose
    A Cimzia (certolizumab pegol) overdose seems unlikely because the medicine is injected by your doctor. This eMedTV page further explains why an overdose of Cimzia seems unlikely and explores various treatment options that may be used for an overdose.
  • Cimzia Side Effects
    Possibly serious Cimzia side effects that require medical attention include chills, fever, or seizures. As this eMedTV page explains, however, most side effects are mild and do not require medical attention in most cases (such as joint pain).
  • Cimzia Uses
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Cimzia is used for relieving the signs and symptoms of Crohn's disease and other inflammatory conditions. This article explains how the medication works and explores possible off-label uses of the drug.
  • Cimzia Warnings and Precautions
    If you have diabetes, let your healthcare provider know before you start taking Cimzia. This eMedTV article lists other conditions to tell your doctor about before using Cimzia. Warnings and precautions on who should not use this drug are also included.
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