Colitis Articles A-Z

Asacol - Azulfidine Drug Class

This page contains links to eMedTV Colitis Articles containing information on subjects from Asacol to Azulfidine Drug Class. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Asacol
    Asacol is a medication that has been licensed for the treatment of ulcerative colitis. This eMedTV Web page describes the effects of Asacol, offers general dosing information for the drug, and lists side effects that may occur during treatment.
  • Asacol (Mesalamine) Drug Information
    This eMedTV segment provides some basic drug information on Asacol (mesalamine), a prescription medicine used to treat ulcerative colitis. This article explains how it works, what it is used for, and why it may not be the best choice for everyone.
  • Asacol 400 Mg Tablets
    As this eMedTV page explains, Asacol tablets come in one strength -- 400 mg. This article briefly describes when and how Asacol is taken, including some of the factors that will affect your dose. A link to more detailed information is also provided.
  • Asacol and Breastfeeding
    Asacol is known to pass through breast milk to nursing infants. This article on the eMedTV Web site further discusses Asacol and breastfeeding, and describes the side effects that have been seen in breastfed infants whose mothers have taken Asacol.
  • Asacol and Hair Loss
    Certain side effects may occur with Asacol, and hair loss is an infrequent but possible problem. As this eMedTV page explains, however, since hair loss is so common in the general population, it is difficult to say if it is actually caused by Asacol.
  • Asacol and Insomnia
    Insomnia is a potential side effect of Asacol. This section of the eMedTV library offers more information on Asacol and insomnia, and includes suggestions for improving sleep habits. If insomnia doesn't improve, be sure to talk with your doctor.
  • Asacol and Pregnancy
    If you are taking Asacol and pregnancy occurs, you should let your doctor know. This eMedTV page explains that while the drug did not appear to cause harm when given to pregnant animals, the full risks of taking Asacol during pregnancy are not known.
  • Asacol Dangers
    Although most people tolerate it well, Asacol can cause side effects like depression and jaundice. This eMedTV page takes a quick look at potentially dangerous side effects of Asacol and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Asacol Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, the starting Asacol dosage for treating mild-to-moderately active ulcerative colitis is two 400-mg tablets three times a day. This article covers factors that can affect Asacol dosing, such as other drugs you're taking.
  • Asacol Drug Class
    As explained in this selection from the eMedTV archives, Asacol belongs to a class of drugs known as aminosalicylates. This article briefly describes how Asacol works and offers a link to a detailed article on this prescription drug.
  • Asacol Drug Interactions
    Warfarin and digoxin are among the drugs that may potentially cause Asacol drug interactions. As this eMedTV page explains, interactions with Asacol can reduce the effectiveness of the medicines, and you may need to be monitored closely by a doctor.
  • Asacol for Ulcerative Colitis
    There are other treatments for ulcerative colitis besides surgery, such as medications like Asacol. This eMedTV article takes a closer look at using Asacol for this purpose and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Asacol HD
    Asacol HD is a prescription medicine used for the short-term treatment of active ulcerative colitis. This eMedTV Web page describes the effects of the drug, explains how it works, and offers information on when and how to take it.
  • Asacol HD Dosage
    The standard dose of Asacol HD for the treatment of ulcerative colitis is two tablets three times a day. As this eMedTV resource explains, this is the standard dosage for everyone, regardless of your age or weight.
  • Asacol HD Drug Information
    This page of the eMedTV site provides some basic information on Asacol HD, a drug used for the treatment of ulcerative colitis. It explains a few do's and don'ts when taking it and stresses the importance of discussing safety precautions with your doctor.
  • Asacol HD Drug Interactions
    Warfarin, digoxin, and thiopurine medicines may cause drug interactions with Asacol HD. This eMedTV segment describes the potential effects of these drug interactions and lists other medications that may interfere with Asacol HD.
  • Asacol HD Side Effects
    Common side effects of Asacol HD include abdominal pain, headache, and vomiting. This eMedTV Web page lists other possible side effects, including serious problems that require medical attention and rare but possible side effects.
  • Asacol HD Uses
    Asacol HD is licensed for the short-term treatment of moderately active ulcerative colitis. This eMedTV article discusses the uses of Asacol HD in more detail (including possible off-label uses) and describes how this prescription medicine works.
  • Asacol HD Warnings and Precautions
    Talk to your doctor before taking Asacol HD if you have kidney disease or pyloric stenosis. This eMedTV page lists other warnings and precautions for Asacol HD, including information on who should not use the drug.
  • Asacol Indications
    Asacol is a prescription medicine used to treat ulcerative colitis. This eMedTV Web selection takes a closer look at the uses (or "indications") for Asacol, including how it is only approved for use in adults and details on how the drug works.
  • Asacol Medication Information
    If you have ulcerative colitis, your healthcare provider may prescribe Asacol. This eMedTV Web article provides important information on Asacol, including possible side effects of the medication, dosing information, and general safety precautions.
  • Asacol Overdose
    There have been very few reported cases of Asacol overdose. This portion of the eMedTV archives lists some of the available treatment options for an overdose on Asacol (such as pumping the stomach and supportive care).
  • Asacol Risks
    In most cases, Asacol is a safe and effective treatment for ulcerative colitis. However, as this eMedTV article explains, reactions are possible. This article talks about the risks associated with Asacol, with details on who should avoid it entirely.
  • Asacol Safety
    People with kidney disease may not be able to safely use Asacol. This selection from the eMedTV Web site discusses other potential safety concerns to be aware of before using this medicine. A link to more information is also included.
  • Asacol Side Effects
    Among the most common side effects of Asacol are belching, vomiting, and constipation. This eMedTV segment lists other common side effects, as well as a number of less common side effects and side effects that you should report to your doctor.
  • Asacol Uses
    Asacol is used for treating a type of inflammatory bowel disease called ulcerative colitis. This eMedTV resource briefly covers the symptoms of this condition, explains how Asacol works, and discusses possible "off-label" Asacol uses.
  • Asacol Warnings and Precautions
    Asacol may potentially worsen the symptoms of ulcerative colitis in some people. This eMedTV page lists other Asacol warnings and precautions you should be aware of before starting the drug and offers information on who should not take it at all.
  • Ascol
    Asacol is commonly used for the treatment of ulcerative colitis. This page on the eMedTV site further describes the medication, with information on its effects, dosing, and possible side effects. Ascol is a common misspelling of Asacol.
  • Asecol
    Asacol is a medication that can be prescribed to treat ulcerative colitis in adults. This page on the eMedTV site provides information about Asacol effects, potential side effects, and precautions and warnings. Asecol is a common misspelling of Asacol.
  • Asicol
    Asacol is a prescription drug that is used for the treatment of ulcerative colitis. This article from the eMedTV archives explains how Asacol works and describes its uses, effects, and possible side effects. Asicol is a common misspelling of Asacol.
  • Azathioprine
    Azathioprine is a drug that is used to treat rheumatoid arthritis and prevent kidney transplant rejection. This eMedTV page provides an overview of this prescription medication, including information on how it works and potential side effects.
  • Azathioprine (Imuran) Information
    This eMedTV segment features information on azathioprine (Imuran), a medication used to treat a certain type of arthritis and prevent organ rejection. This article takes a quick look at how it works, dosing guidelines, and side effects.
  • Azathioprine Dosing
    Generally, the azathioprine dosage for preventing kidney transplant rejection is 3 to 5 mg per kg daily. This eMedTV page explains the dosing guidelines your healthcare provider will follow and also provides dosing amounts for rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Azothioprine
    As this eMedTV segment explains, azathioprine may be used to prevent kidney transplant rejection or treat rheumatoid arthritis. This page also explains the factors that may affect your dosage. Azothioprine is a common misspelling of azathioprine.
  • Azulfadine
    Azulfidine is a medicine that can be prescribed to treat symptoms of ulcerative colitis. This eMedTV page explains how the drug works and offers information on its effects and possible side effects. Azulfadine is a common misspelling of Azulfidine.
  • Azulfidine
    Azulfidine is a prescription medicine that is commonly used for treating ulcerative colitis. This eMedTV Web page offers a general overview of the drug, including information on how it works, its effects, possible side effects, and more.
  • Azulfidine (Sulfasalazine) Drug Information
    This page from the eMedTV Web site provides some basic information on Azulfidine (sulfasalazine), a drug used to treat ulcerative colitis. This segment briefly explains how the drug works and what to tell the healthcare provider prescribing it.
  • Azulfidine 500 Mg Tablets
    This eMedTV segment explains that Azulfidine comes in the form of 500-mg tablets; however, the amount you are prescribed will be based on various factors. This page describes the general starting dose for adults and links to more information on dosing.
  • Azulfidine and Breastfeeding
    It is generally considered safe for breastfeeding women to take Azulfidine. This eMedTV page further explores Azulfidine and breastfeeding, including information on the side effects that may occur in a nursing baby who is exposed to the drug.
  • Azulfidine and Pregnancy
    Azulfidine is generally considered safe for use during pregnancy. This page on the eMedTV Web site offers more information on Azulfidine and pregnancy, including an explanation of the clinical studies conducted on pregnant animals.
  • Azulfidine Dangers
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, Azulfidine can be dangerous in certain situations. This article looks at some of the safety issues to be aware of before starting treatment with this medication, including who may need to avoid it.
  • Azulfidine Dosage
    Adults starting ulcerative colitis treatment usually take an Azulfidine dosage of 3000 to 4000 mg. This eMedTV page lists tips for those taking the drug and also offers dosing guidelines for those whose ulcerative colitis is in remission.
  • Azulfidine Drug Class
    As this page from the eMedTV Web site explains, Azulfidine is a prescription drug classified as an aminosalicylate. This article briefly describes how this medicine works to treat ulcerative colitis and provides a link to more detailed information.
Terms of Use
Advertise with Us
Contact Us
About eMedTV
Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2006-2017 Clinaero, Inc.
eMedTV serves only as an informational resource. This site does not dispense medical advice or advice of any kind. Site users seeking medical advice about their specific situation should consult with their own physician. Click Terms of Use for more information.